Duke University | Pratt School of Engineering

The NTFL Research Team at FCIEMAS

The Nanomaterials and Thin Films Lab

Learn more about the research being conducted at the Nanomaterials and Thin Films Lab

Atomic Layer Deposition Reactor

Find out more about the ALD Reactor from Isvar Cordova's latest update

The 915 MHz MPECVD Growth Lab

Find out more about the growth system and possible collaborations by contacting Charles, Erich, or Steve

Nanomaterials and Thin Films Lab

Recent developments in the field of nanomaterials have resulted in exciting new possibilities in numerous applications. The research team at the Nanomaterials and Thin Films Lab, under the leadership of Professor Jeff Glass, is dedicated to exploring these possibilities in a scientific, innovative, and practical way. The team applies electrical, optics, materials, and electrochemical engineering expertise to develop novel nanostructures that address large-scale problems pertinent to the global energy-water nexus and growing need for nanotechnology based sensing.

The Nanomaterials and Thin Films Lab utilizes a wide selection of materials processing and characterization tools, as well as custom instrumentation, to push the boundaries of nanotechnology. Areas of specialization and available tools include:

  • Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)
  • Atomic layer deposition (ALD)
  • Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and other electrochemical methods
  • Field emission (FE) characterization and novel FE device fabrication
  • Advanced materials characterization and surface analysis, including in-vacuo analysis
The resources of the team are focused into several application areas:
  • Development of a micro mass spectrometer
  • Application of coded aperture spectroscopy to magnetic sector mass spectrometry
  • Liquid waste disinfection for the developing world
  • Photoelectrochemical water-splitting
  • Supercapacitors
  • Advanced materials for neural stimulation

The unique intrinsic properties of nanomaterials are often dependent on their morphological features and surface chemistry. The significance of these features is particularly important when applied to the electrochemistry and sensor development. The research team at the Nanomaterials and Thin Films lab is driven to contribute to the science of nanomaterials and to develop new materials that yield improved performance in devices.  The iterative feedback loop between materials processing, characterization and device properties yields improvements in both scientific understanding and device performance.